Newbridge at Gunnislake set to reopen

Newbridge at Gunnislake set to reopen

Below information taken form Devon County Council Website – 17th April 2019. Newbridge at Gunnislake is on schedule to reopen by lunchtime on Good Friday (19 April). Repair work has been completed a week ahead of schedule and now teams are waiting for the lime mortar repairs to reach sufficient strength before they can reopen the bridge to traffic. Yesterday

CityBus Timetables – updated as of 3 April 2019

Update at 15.00 on 3rd April 2019: Due to the closure of the bridge on the A390 between Gunnislake and Gulworthy the service 79/A will be on diversion. An emergency timetable can be accessed and downloaded from the bottom of this page.  In general the service 79/A will operate from Gunnislake to Callington and passengers will be able to change buses

Emergency Bus Timetables – Bridge Closure (until further notice)

Below information taken from https://www.plymouthbus.co.uk/news-service-updates/gunnislake-bridge-damage-affecting-services-7979a/ – Wednesday 3rd April ** Update at 16.33 on 2nd April 2019: After an RTC we have been informed that due to structural damage Gunnislake Bridge will be closed for several days. From Wednesday 3rd April we will be operating an emergency timetable. More information will follow when we have a better idea on how long the closure

Tamar Trails

Tamar Trails

Where will the trails lead you? Explore the network of trails on bike or foot, try some outdoor activities or relax, enjoy and learn at the Tamar Trails Centre & Café. A great place for family days out in Devon or Cornwall whether you are on holiday or live locally. Come and see what we have to offer at this hidden gem in the Tamar Valley on the Devon and Cornwall border.

Local Area Walks – COTEHELE CIRCULAR via DUNG QUAY and the HOUSE – By Jean Croft

Local Area Walks – COTEHELE CIRCULAR via DUNG QUAY and the HOUSE – By Jean Croft

Our walk today takes place on land owned by the National Trust, a charity devoted to preserving and protecting historic places and spaces. The National Trust bought their very first house, Alfriston Clergy House in Sussex in 1896 for £10 (about £600 in today’s money). It is believed that a decorative cornice in one of the rooms there may have given the trust